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The ultimate guide to renting


  If you’re moving out of home or relocating to a new suburb, town or city, renting is the simplest and easiest way to find a place to live.   Renting offers more flexibility than owning a home and requires less of a financial commitment. Renting also allows you to live in an area where you might not be able to afford to buy, and it’s easier to move when your needs change.   Whether you’re renting for financial or lifestyle reasons, it’s important to understanding the process of finding and applying for a rental property, as well as your rights as a tenant.   We thought we would share this valuable guide to answer your most important questions about renting.   It’s designed to provide you with general advice to help you find and secure a rental property and make it feel like home.   If you have you need any further help with finding a local rental property, please get in touch with us today.   Or ...


The ATOs Rental Properties Resource Guide 2020


  Resource for owners of rental properties, from the ATO     The Rental Properties Guide 2020 will help you, as an owner of rental property in Australia, determine which rental income is assessable for tax purposes which expenses are allowable deductions which records you need to keep n what you need to know when you sell your rental property.   Many, but not all, of the expenses associated with rental properties will be deductible.   This guide explains: how to apportion your expenses if only part of them are tax deductible what expenses are not deductible when you can claim those expenses that are deductible – some you can claim in the tax return for the income year in which you spent the money – others must be claimed over a number of years (including decline in value of depreciating assets and capital works expenses). Click here to access the guide


The Australian office market after COVID-19: Three impacts for landlords


  Coronavirus will impact the way the real estate industry functions, and how people work, into the future. Some of the changes will represent an acceleration of trends already underway, whereas other impacts will mean a sharp turn from the previously established course.   Human-connectivity will underpin on-going demand for office space, and nobody believes our CBDs are going to remain ghost towns forever. However, the impact is clearly going to be far greater than just a few more hand sanitiser dispensers in building lobbies and offices.   This blog post specifically focuses on the impact of COVID-19 on landlords of commercial office buildings in Australia. Here are three predictions of the impact on landlords of major office buildings in Australia in a post COVID-19 world.   1. A loss of momentum towards in-house leasing   It seems inevitable that vacancy rates are going to increase substantially. There was already a lot of new office stock rec...


How property search behaviour has changed during coronavirus crisis


  Demand for home offices, studios and granny flats have soared amid the coronavirus pandemic, as cooped-up house hunters seek out more space.   Separate areas in which to work and unwind became increasingly front of mind for renters and buyers in recent months, new Domain data shows, with searches for home offices more than doubling across several states.   House hunters were also increasingly on the lookout for balconies, gardens and courtyards and retreats, according to the keyword search data.   “That’s a result of being cooped up,” said Melbourne buyer’s advocate Cate Bakos. “We’ve had an enormous uptake of people wanting an extra room for a study or even having two studies, because if you’ve got two people working from home professionally and they’re both in a lot of video meetings it can be hard to work in the one space.”   Property hunters in Victoria, which has had the strictest s...


Rethinking your living arrangements because of COVID-19 crisis? Dont forget climate change


  Those rethinking their living situation during the coronavirus pandemic may be forgetting one crucial detail: climate change, experts warn.   The COVID-19-change has seen cooped-up city dwellers plan a move to the bush and beach, but new residents to these areas are at risk of getting stuck with a property that will become unsafe as the climate changes, Climate Risk director of science Karl Mallon says. “With sea-changes and tree-changes we need to think coastal inundation, bushfires and flooding,” Dr Mallon said. “If you grew up in one of those towns, you know where the flood zones are and how prevalent bushfires are, but if you move in you don’t. “It’s a known problem in the emergency management sector that the newbies are highly vulnerable because they don’t have the local knowledge.”   Dr Mallon has helped to develop tools to assess this risk. He says as climate change worsens, the risks will ...


Achieving a successful sale as pandemic and recession collide


    Before COVID-19 struck and the whole country went into physical distancing mode, the biggest challenge for the national property market was a glut of buyers and a scarcity of sellers.   As we emerge from the health crisis, the same conditions are apparent – but there is much more trepidation from buyers than there was previously.   As the country initially went into lockdown in mid-March there was a slump in search activity on realestate.com.au, but since the JobKeeper package and mortgage holidays have been announced there have been consistent week-on-week increases in the number of people searching for properties to buy.   As well as the high volume of general search activity, there has been a spike in serious buyer activity, which includes buyers who look at specific listings a number of times, look at the photos for a listing multiple times, save the property, share the property and/or make an enquiry with the agent.   ...