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Be aware: flexible braided hoses can cause major flooding


We recently experienced a major issue/problem with one of our rental properties. The tenant called about 9pm on a Sunday night to say she had returned home to find water was coming through the ceiling into the living area downstairs. We recently experienced a major issue/problem with one of our rental properties. The tenant called about 9pm on a Sunday night to say she had returned home to find water was coming through the ceiling into the living area downstairs. Fortunately, the tenant had the presence of mind to turn the water off at what she thought was the source and mopped the floor. A couple of hours later she contacted us again to say there was another leak and that this time she couldn’t stop it. A friendly neighbour helped her turn the water off at the mains, but so much water had escaped that it caused the ceiling to collapse. It also caused flooding to the adjacent townhouse. Significant damage   The lower level of the property sustained significant dama...


Ten Top Tips for Renters: How to get your deposit back


      Tenants coming to the end of their rental agreement undoubtedly want to get their rental deposit back at the end of their tenancy. Usually this a fairly substantial sum of around four weeks’ rent, representing a significant outlay especially for younger renters.   However, there can be situations where your landlord is able to keep a portion, or the total, of your rental bond. Luckily there are ways to avoid this from happening or to salvage as much of your bond refund as possible.   Here are 10 steps towards getting your bond refund.   1) Check your initial condition report before applying for a bond refund   Find the condition report provided to you by your property manager when you entered the house. This will quickly allow you to assess the condition of the house relative to when you moved in. Your property manager will be using this same report to determine whether they need to deduct funds from the bond.   Take the ...


Who should you use as a referee on your rental application?


Just as references are vital when applying for a new job, references on a rental property application can be the deciding factor in a tenant’s success in securing a property.   Landlords more often than not outsource the management of tenancies to professional property managers. What a property manager and landlord want to know is that a prospective tenant will pay their rent on time, look after the property and generally be a good person to deal with over the life of the tenancy.     Property managers will check an applicant’s references to ensure they are a good future tenant. Picture: realestate.com.au/rent   To check this, property managers require references as part of the rental application process, whether that’s a paper copy or online, like realestate.com.au’s 1form.   But the big question is, who should tenants put as references on their rental applications? And how many is best? Here’s everything you ne...


Affordable rental initiative gives landlords tax deduction for discounted rents


  Melbourne renter Rebecca Shiels never expected the generosity of a landlord to help her get back on her feet.   As a newly single mother, she feared for her ability to find a suitable home for herself and her young boy, in a market in desperate need of more affordable properties.    “When I separated I had nothing and was living with family and just trying to get back on my feet and the idea of renting on my own was so appealing but on the financial side of it I couldn’t do,” she said.  “I have a little boy, and rentals that were in my financial capacity were not great for him, they didn’t feel safe.”   That was until she came across a two-bedroom apartment in Ormond, in Melbourne’s south-east, advertised for $300 a week — $250 below the market rate — with HomeGround Real Estate, a not-for-profit real estate agency opened in 2014.   “It’s been life-chang...